Give Local: Running is an Issaquah Thanksgiving Tradition

Larissa Kolasinski

Issaquah Turkey Trot

You might recognize me as the gal who is always running around the neighborhood. With the extra time I have had during the pandemic, I have put in a lot of miles to train for upcoming marathons. Because of the pandemic, so many road races have been canceled or are going virtual. For me, one of the most unfortunate cancellations this year was the 2020 Boston Marathon in April. As one of the world’s longest-running annual marathons, this is the first time it has been canceled in 124 years. (Yes, it even still went on as a military relay in 1918 during World War I.)

Running through the rainy winter season can be a slog, but I have always looked forward to the welcoming atmosphere of the annual Issaquah Turkey Trot in November. Every Thanksgiving morning, thousands of “trotters” line up by the Issaquah Community Center for 3.1 miles of earning those extra calories at Thanksgiving dinner (and to benefit the Issaquah Food and Clothing Bank). This year marks the 10th annual Turkey Trot. I have fond memories of racing the 5K in high school with my cross-country teammates and greeting neighbors with holiday wishes early in the morning.

I recently got involved as a volunteer on the Issaquah Turkey Trot’s planning committee. Last year, we had about 4,200 participants. The Turkey Trot is rapidly becoming one of the largest events in Issaquah. This year, the event will be virtual with seven different courses to choose from, including one in our very own Central Park. For an entry fee of $15-$30, the marked course can be “trotted” any time over the Thanksgiving holiday weekend (Thursday, November 26 – Sunday, November 29), and participants each receive an Issaquah Turkey Trot t-shirt, hat, or buff.

Look for me at Central Park on Thanksgiving weekend!

For Issaquah Turkey Trot registration and volunteer information, visit issaquahturkeytrot.org.

Photo: Larissa (right) with sister, Andie, at the 2019 Issaquah Turkey Trot.

As published in November 2020 Connections >>